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Hello Everyone!

I would try to quickly give background of myself before asking my concerns.
I did my B. Tech. in Mechanical Engineering with a percentage of 82% (toppers is 86%). I am working as software professional (SAP Basis Consultant) for a MNC since 1 year. I am looking forward to pursue MS in CS or MIS in USA, not because I am bad in ME (I secured reasonably good rank in GATE), but because I have had a passion for computers since childhood and heard it is easier to get a job in this field in USA.

My concern - is it wise to change my field?
If yes, I am confused to choose between MS in CS or MIS, since I am not very much interested in management stuff but MIS is would lighter in subject which I believe would be easier for somebody who is switching career like me. Also, I always had a passion for doing some research work. And, I am not sure how my undergrad degree would affect this.
Will I get good universities for my profile?

Thanks for reading,
Please try to provide your valuable insight on my situation, would really appreciate it.

Additional Info on my profile:
-I am yet to write GRE (preparing now with intention to give in december).
-My skill set in computers includes:
-Database Administration, Unix Administration, SAP Application Administration
-Little experience in coding in C, Core Java & Python
-Little experience in shell scripting
- Also, I am targeting for spring 2019(is it a good time to go?)
An MS in MIS would not necessarily be "lighter" - that's a misconception. That said, an MIS/IS degree will be more in line with your previous work as a SAP consultant, so I'd say that is what I'd go for.

Beware though, that an MS in any field is not easy as such. Sure, looking from the outside, it might seem that an MS in MIS is much easier than an MS in CS, but an MIS degree does come with its own set of challenges. The program requires a completely different set of skills to succeed as compared to a CS program, and getting internships and/or jobs after an MS in MIS might actually be harder than after an MS in CS in some cases, if you don't have the luck and combination of skills needed to succeed in the job market. If any of this scares you, don't bother applying, because no matter what you pick, MIS or CS, it's going to not be an easy ride.

If you're interested in research during your MS, I'd recommend an IS program over an MIS one (yes, they are different) because most MS in MIS programs do not offer a lot of chances to get involved in research being conducted. On the other hand, some IT/IS programs might have a thesis option you can consider taking.

Quote:My concern - is it wise to change my field?

Why not? If you're not interested in mechanical engineering, switch. Nothing wrong with that. Just keep in mind that changes like these aren't easy, and they'll need you to put in a lot more effort into everything as compared to someone who didn't do that, so be prepared for the extra efforts needed.

Quote:it is easier to get a job in this field in USA

Easier than in mechanical engineering, perhaps, but in absolute terms, no. There are a ton of people graduating with MIS degrees, all of whom have skills that can be satisfied in some jobs by CS professionals too in many cases. So an MIS professional has to position herself right and market herself properly in order to get a job. CS graduates might have it a little easier I think, because their degree and learning can be directly applied to many job requirements straight away, whereas that might not always be the case with MIS grads, who might need to do more convincing. Again, I'm not trying to scare you or anyone else here who's reading this, but just making everyone aware of the ground realities.
(09-10-2017 09:24 PM)The_Observer Wrote: [ -> ]An MS in MIS would not necessarily be "lighter" - that's a misconception. That said, an MIS/IS degree will be more in line with your previous work as a SAP consultant, so I'd say that is what I'd go for.

Beware though, that an MS in any field is not easy as such. Sure, looking from the outside, it might seem that an MS in MIS is much easier than an MS in CS, but an MIS degree does come with its own set of challenges. The program requires a completely different set of skills to succeed as compared to a CS program, and getting internships and/or jobs after an MS in MIS might actually be harder than after an MS in CS in some cases, if you don't have the luck and combination of skills needed to succeed in the job market. If any of this scares you, don't bother applying, because no matter what you pick, MIS or CS, it's going to not be an easy ride.

If you're interested in research during your MS, I'd recommend an IS program over an MIS one (yes, they are different) because most MS in MIS programs do not offer a lot of chances to get involved in research being conducted. On the other hand, some IT/IS programs might have a thesis option you can consider taking.

Quote:My concern - is it wise to change my field?

Why not? If you're not interested in mechanical engineering, switch. Nothing wrong with that. Just keep in mind that changes like these aren't easy, and they'll need you to put in a lot more effort into everything as compared to someone who didn't do that, so be prepared for the extra efforts needed.

Quote:it is easier to get a job in this field in USA

Easier than in mechanical engineering, perhaps, but in absolute terms, no. There are a ton of people graduating with MIS degrees, all of whom have skills that can be satisfied in some jobs by CS professionals too in many cases. So an MIS professional has to position herself right and market herself properly in order to get a job. CS graduates might have it a little easier I think, because their degree and learning can be directly applied to many job requirements straight away, whereas that might not always be the case with MIS grads, who might need to do more convincing. Again, I'm not trying to scare you or anyone else here who's reading this, but just making everyone aware of the ground realities.

Thanks a ton The_Observer for the quick response!
Really appreciate your advice!

Based on your response I feel CS program is more advantageous but I am not sure why you are suggesting MIS program over it. Excuse me if I got your intention wrong.
Also, could you throw some light on IT/IS program you mentioned? Would it be possible for you to provide an university which offers this course, just as pointer for me to understand the course structure.

Thanks again!
A CS program might indeed be more advantageous in certain ways, sure, but do you have enough academic preparation, given that your bachelor's is in Mech? Also, you'll have to convince the AdCom that you're academically qualified to study advanced topics in subjects like theoretical computer science, operating systems, networking, data structures, algorithms, etc. If you're serious about applying for an MS in CS, I'd recommend you take some MOOCs to cover some of those deficiencies.

Also:

MIS = Management Information Systems
IS = Information Systems
IT = Information Technology
IM = Information Management

All the above programs belong to the same family (more or less), and can be related to varying extents. Example programs are UNCC's MSIT, RIT's MSIT, RPI's MSIT and GMU's MSAIT (all of which are more technical as compared to your regular MS in MIS), and then on the other side of the spectrum, MS in MIS programs on one end, and MS in IM programs on the other. Search online and on Edulix, you'll find a ton more examples. Look through them and build a better list.
(09-12-2017 04:35 AM)The_Observer Wrote: [ -> ]A CS program might indeed be more advantageous in certain ways, sure, but do you have enough academic preparation, given that your bachelor's is in Mech? Also, you'll have to convince the AdCom that you're academically qualified to study advanced topics in subjects like theoretical computer science, operating systems, networking, data structures, algorithms, etc. If you're serious about applying for an MS in CS, I'd recommend you take some MOOCs to cover some of those deficiencies.

Also:

MIS = Management Information Systems
IS = Information Systems
IT = Information Technology
IM = Information Management

All the above programs belong to the same family (more or less), and can be related to varying extents. Example programs are UNCC's MSIT, RIT's MSIT, RPI's MSIT and GMU's MSAIT (all of which are more technical as compared to your regular MS in MIS), and then on the other side of the spectrum, MS in MIS programs on one end, and MS in IM programs on the other. Search online and on Edulix, you'll find a ton more examples. Look through them and build a better list.

Thanks a lot for the prompt response!

Really appreciate your effort to suggest me the courses.I will try to explore more about the courses. Also thanks for suggesting me to take the online courses.
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